RE: SUMMARY: Readability studies on fonts--serif and sans serif

Subject: RE: SUMMARY: Readability studies on fonts--serif and sans serif
From: "Murrell, Thomas" <TMurrell -at- alldata -dot- net>
To: TECHWR-L <TECHWR-L -at- LISTS -dot- RAYCOMM -dot- COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2000 10:43:26 -0500

> From: Christensen, Kent[SMTP:lkchris -at- sandia -dot- gov]
>
> In html you can simply specify <FONT FACE=sans serif> or <FONT
> FACE=serif>,
> which is more "generic" than specifying a font name such as arial. Works
> in
> both browsers. Can be overridden by user in Netscape but not Internet
> Explorer. It would be a pretty determined Netscape user. BTW, the New
> York
> Times on the web uses <FONT FACE=times>. What do we suppose this means?
>
I guess it should be no surprise that the New York Times uses a "times"
font, eh?

Related to this issue, we make extensive use of Cascading Style Sheets,
which I think are wonderful for controlling all sorts of presentation issues
with much more specificity that HTML allows. I wonder though if browser
settings can override CSS as far as font is concerned.

I know that in the past a few listers have questioned the value of
specifying fonts at all; the general tenor of the comments being, "Let users
decide what fonts they want displayed on their browsers." I don't wish to
disenfranchise users, but I do like all of the capabilities CSS allows. Can
the user override the font in the browser? We use only IE here, so I don't
get a good reading on this.

Tom Murrell




Previous by Author: RE: Policy=Function=Operation=Goal=Task=Process
Next by Author: RE: Numbering Convention for Policies & Procedures
Previous by Thread: RE: SUMMARY: Readability studies on fonts--serif and sans serif
Next by Thread: RE: SUMMARY: Readability studies on fonts--serif and sans serif


What this post helpful? Share it with friends and colleagues:

Sponsored Ads


Sponsored Ads