RE: CBT tools and project management?

Subject: RE: CBT tools and project management?
From: "John Fleming" <johnf -at- ecn -dot- ab -dot- ca>
To: "TECHWR-L" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- raycomm -dot- com>
Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 05:48:09 -0700

> Subject: CBT tools and project management?
> From: Emily Cotlier <Emily -dot- Cotlier -at- zeacom -dot- net>
> Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2001 16:03:59 +1300
> X-Message-Number: 6

> Greetings everyone,

> About a year ago, I posted asking for information on computer-based
training
> development tools, i.e., software that you would use to assemble
your
> company's computer-based training. I'm asking here again because
I'm
> particularly looking for a tool that is extremely user-friendly and
easy to
> use, and I'm interested in the viewpoints of experienced users.

Last year, I was at a local STC meeting, and the evening's featured
speaker was showcasing a computer based training package they'd
developed for one of their clients. The whole purpose of the package
was train employees in the importance of safety procedures. It
appeared easy to navigate, came with neat video clips, and sound. I
was quite impressed.

I believe the software they used to develop it was Macromedia Director
7.

> Our training department is saying, "Oh, we'll develop HTML-based CBT
for our
> programs with this freelancer we've used before." Something about
this sets
> off my publication-management intuition as not being the most
efficient or
> easily managed course of action. It seems to me that it would be
better in
> the long run to invest in a tool and create the CBT deliverables
in-house,
> as far as keeping the knowledge in the company goes. I'd love to
know other
> people's opinions on this.

My question is, do you have the expertise in-house to create the CBT?
Or can you develop the expertise in-house in a way that is cost
effective for your company?

If the answer to either of these questions is yes, then it may be
better for the company to purchase the CBT software and do the work
in-house.

If the answer to both of these questions is no, then it may be better
for the company to contract the work out to someone who does have the
software and the expertise.

My $0.02

--

John Fleming
Technical Writer
Edmonton, Alberta
email: johnf -at- ecn -dot- ab -dot- ca



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