RE: Opinion anyone?

Subject: RE: Opinion anyone?
From: "John Rosberg" <jrosberg -at- interwoven -dot- com>
To: "Alaina Stern" <alaina12 -at- gmail -dot- com>, <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>
Date: Tue, 6 Mar 2007 15:09:23 -0600

Alaina

Given the distributed nature of many companies and their doc
departments, as a hiring manager, I would view your background as a
strong positive attribute.

I suggest you use it as a key skill or characteristic -- proven ability
to work with teams world-wide, etc etc etc.

John

-----Original Message-----
From: Alaina Stern [mailto:alaina12 -at- gmail -dot- com]
Sent: Monday, March 05, 2007 12:15 PM
To: techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com
Subject: Opinion anyone?

Hi Everyone,

I need your advice to help me get out of the grueling situation that I'm
in.
I'm a Technical Writer with five years of documentation experience. I
moved
to United States last year and worked on an online-help project for a
fortune hundred company.

I have genuine liking for my profession and I absolutely love
technology. I
keep myself up-to-date with the latest in our field. I have strong
recommendations from colleagues and employers. But somehow, all this is
not
helping me find a job. I get interview calls from companies based on my
resume but once they hear that I have just six months of American
experience
they disappear. My non-U.S experience isn't given any consideration. No
one's even ready to take a writing test or take a technical test and see
if
I can actually do my job.

Today a recruiter even suggested that I take up some QA engineering
training
(I'm guessing because of my Electronics Engineering degree and
programming
experience). She went on to tell me that Technical Writing is not for a
non-American and that without experience, I'll go nowhere. My eternal
optimism has evaporated. I'm fed up of people calling me and saying I
don't
have adequate experience. Where do I fit in ten years of experience in
my
twenty seven years on earth?

Documenting technology is what I like. If I have a career, this is what
I
want to do. I'm ready to give certifications and whatever it takes to
give
me an edge. What do you all suggest? I am not good at networking. Should
I
start attending Technical Communication seminars? Get any specific
certification? Get a Master's degree?

Please help!

Thank you,
Alaina

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References:
Opinion anyone?: From: Alaina Stern

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