Re: Certification -- what's in it for writers

Subject: Re: Certification -- what's in it for writers
From: "Gene Kim-Eng" <techwr -at- genek -dot- com>
To: <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>
Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2011 07:06:33 -0700

I'm not talking about a functional resume. I hate those too. What I'm talking about is presenting yourself in the same way an outsourcing company or temp agency does. Look for broad categories you can split your years of experience into, for example five years from 1980-1985 as "contract aerospace technical writer" and 1995-2000 as "contract software technical writer," or 2000-2005 as "online help technical writer," and then describe the work you did for all the companies you worked at during each as if for a single company - you - and list the clients for that period. You can put the chronological list of companies and major projects there.. Then preface it with an introduction that presents yourself as if you were that company, lists your most impressive achievements and name-drops the better-known companies you did them for.

Gene Kim-Eng


----- Original Message ----- From: "William Sherman" <bsherman77 -at- embarqmail -dot- com>

I did one of those functional type resumes about 20 years ago as it was building to too large of a size. It got zero results. Too far ahead and too far from the norm.

A year ago, I did another, on the advice of a manager where I was about the be laid off. He said that was what he and other managers were looking for. I got very little response to it, and what usually I got, was a call from a recruiter to rewrite it in a conventional manner - title, company, time, job description and duties.

So my experience has been that even though this seems like the logical and right way to approach a resume situation like this, those doing the hiring are stuck in their old formal ways and discard it.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Create and publish documentation through multiple channels with Doc-To-Help.
Choose your authoring formats and get any output you may need. Try
Doc-To-Help, now with MS SharePoint integration, free for 30-days.
http://www.doctohelp.com

---
You are currently subscribed to TECHWR-L as archive -at- web -dot- techwr-l -dot- com -dot-
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
techwr-l-leave -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com
or visit http://lists.techwr-l.com/mailman/options/techwr-l/archive%40web.techwr-l.com


To subscribe, send a blank email to techwr-l-join -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com

Send administrative questions to admin -at- techwr-l -dot- com -dot- Visit
http://www.techwhirl.com/email-discussion-groups/ for more resources and info.

Looking for articles on Technical Communications? Head over to our online magazine at http://techwhirl.com


References:
Re: Certification -- what's in it for writers: From: William Sherman
Re: Certification -- what's in it for writers: From: Gene Kim-Eng
Re: Certification -- what's in it for writers: From: William Sherman

Previous by Author: Re: STC certification: what's in it for tech writers?
Next by Author: Re: When are NDAs not binding? Was, RE: STC Certification - What Does It Really Mean
Previous by Thread: Re: Certification -- what's in it for writers
Next by Thread: RE: Certification -- what's in it for writers


What this post helpful? Share it with friends and colleagues:

Sponsored Ads


Sponsored Ads