RE: Careers For People Who Don't Like People

Subject: RE: Careers For People Who Don't Like People
From: Kat Kuvinka <katkuvinka -at- hotmail -dot- com>
To: <dick -at- rlhamilton -dot- net>
Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2012 14:49:14 -0400


We sound like a collective Walter Mitty!

At my last job, we all had to take Myers-Briggs. I was surprised at how many managers (we had too many) were Introverts. I know it doesn't mean they are shy or don't like people, but we were all about team and being motivated by the um, collective.

>
> I think the real distinction is between jobs that require full-time contact with other people (salesperson, nurse, teacher, etc.) and those that have a more limited requirement for interaction (like tech writing, accountancy), where you interact with customers, but then go off and spend a significant amount of time working alone.
>
> Those interactions are still critical, but the amount of time and the number of different interactions required is going to be a lot lower and more manageable by people who are more introverted (which doesn't mean they don't like people, they just like them in limited doses).
>
> The article seems to be making that distinction, but explaining it very badly and also assuming that introverts don't like people, which is simply wrong. But the whole article is an ad for University of Phoenix, so the only objective is to get us to click on the links:-).
>
> Richard
> -------
> XML Press
> New from XML Press:
> The Content Pool
> http://xmlpress.net/publications/the-content-pool
>
> On Jul 17, 2012, at 9:55 AM, Kat Kuvinka wrote:
>
> >
> > You know, I kinda glossed overthe second paragraph:
> >
> > "Many writers live a rich life inside their own heads," Ancowitz says. "Depending on what type of writing you do, your need to interact with the outside world may be more dependent on how well you stock your fridge than a burning need to 'party.'"
> >
> > Not sure what the author is trying to say. I stock my fridge because I do need to party. But that private island in the South Pacific is starting to give me a headache...
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >> Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2012 22:03:35 -0700
> >> From: klhra -at- yahoo -dot- com
> >> Subject: Re: Careers For People Who Don't Like People
> >> To: rhearn -at- central1 -dot- com; techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com
> >>
> >> I love it when people who have never done my job tell me what it's like. About as valid as marital advice from a monk.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ________________________________
> >> From: Ron Hearn <rhearn -at- central1 -dot- com>
> >> To: "techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>
> >> Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 1:19 PM
> >> Subject: Careers For People Who Don't Like People
> >>
> >> The following link lists being a TW as number 2 on its list of Six Careers For People Who Don't Like People. http://education.yahoo.net/articles/six_solo_careers.htm?kid=1MNCA
> >>
> >> For TWs it says:
> >> Wish you could be left alone with your thoughts a little more - and deal with people a little less? Consider pursuing a career as a technical writer and you just might get your wish.
> >>
> >> "Many writers live a rich life inside their own heads," Ancowitz says. "Depending on what type of writing you do, your need to interact with the outside world may be more dependent on how well you stock your fridge than a burning need to 'party.'"
> >>
> >> As a technical writer, for example, you might write instruction or operating manuals, says the U.S. Department of Labor. That could mean spending your days gathering and organizing technical information, and figuring out how to explain complicated products or processes so customers can understand them better.
> >>
> >> Click to Find the Right Communications Program Now.
> >>
> >> Education Options: According to the Department of Labor, a college degree is usually required. You might want to consider earning it in journalism, English, or communications, as these are degrees employers generally prefer, says the Department.
> >> ________________________
> >>
> >> I guess TW jobs vary in the amount of interaction they have with people. Mine is filled with people and meetings.
> >>
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >>
> >> Ron Hearn
> >> Documentation Specialist
> >>
> >> Central 1 Credit Union
> >> 1441 Creekside Drive
> >> Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
> >> V6J 4S7
> >>
> >>
>


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Create and publish documentation through multiple channels with Doc-To-Help. Choose your authoring formats and get any output you may need.

Try Doc-To-Help, now with MS SharePoint integration, free for 30-days.

http://bit.ly/doc-to-help

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You are currently subscribed to TECHWR-L as archive -at- web -dot- techwr-l -dot- com -dot-

To unsubscribe send a blank email to
techwr-l-leave -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com


Send administrative questions to admin -at- techwr-l -dot- com -dot- Visit
http://www.techwhirl.com/email-discussion-groups/ for more resources and info.

Looking for articles on Technical Communications? Head over to our online magazine at http://techwhirl.com

Looking for the archived Techwr-l email discussions? Search our public email archives @ http://techwr-l.com/archives


Follow-Ups:

References:
Careers For People Who Don't Like People: From: Ron Hearn
Re: Careers For People Who Don't Like People: From: Keith Hood
RE: Careers For People Who Don't Like People: From: Kat Kuvinka
Re: Careers For People Who Don't Like People: From: Richard L Hamilton

Previous by Author: RE: Careers For People Who Don't Like People
Next by Author: RE: Careers For People Who Don't Like People
Previous by Thread: Re: Careers For People Who Don't Like People
Next by Thread: Re: Careers For People Who Don't Like People


What this post helpful? Share it with friends and colleagues:

Sponsored Ads


Sponsored Ads