Re: Having fun with your resume - good idea/bad idea

Subject: Re: Having fun with your resume - good idea/bad idea
From: Tony Chung <tonyc -at- tonychung -dot- ca>
To: Sue Jones <suej_be -at- yahoo -dot- com>
Date: Thu, 6 Sep 2012 05:55:33 -0700

Many people confuse a request for a resume with a request for a
curriculum vitae (CV). I understood that a CV was the standard
practice in the academic community. I guess it helps a a school
administrator to know the full qualifications of an applicant--maybe
they know one of their previous mentors.

For most jobs, a resume is a snapshot of the candidate, that provides
enough information to entice a second look. Someone once told me that
a resume is not a hiring document; it's a sales pitch. It's a means to
show how much you know about what the company requires, and how well
you sell your abilities to meet those needs.

My LinkedIn profile is public and has everything unfiltered. I used to
have an XML resume, with dreams of building an interface to cut
different versions based on audience criteria I set, but my priority
shifted.

I realized that most people who interview me for one job usually hire
me for my complementary skills, as evidenced by my past work. So now
I'd like to revamp my resume to be more portfolio and samples driven.
I don't know yet how that will look.

As for third person, that is the accepted norm in the HR world. Every
job/outplacement counsellor I worked with taught that. Also, they
taught me to date my experience with the year only, and a prospective
employer got mad at me for it.

-Tony



On 2012-09-06, at 3:51 AM, Sue Jones <suej_be -at- yahoo -dot- com> wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I'm usually a lurker, but this thread has made me smile because just this week I received a 15 page resume for review. This person has listed (in detail) all of the 135 papers and publications they have either written or collaborated on. It's also written in the third person, how do people feel about that? I personally don't like it, but it does make me wonder if they did not actually write the resume themselves. And subsequently, if they did have it written by a third party, they obviously did not trust that person's output because they've now asked me for a review. Interesting...
>
>
> Grt.
> Mrs. Sue Baars-Jones
>
>
> "To achieve greatness...start where you are, use what you have, do what you can." Arthur Ashe.
>

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RE: Having fun with your resume - good idea/bad idea: From: Sue Jones

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