Re: when is it ok to leave a contract job?

Subject: Re: when is it ok to leave a contract job?
From: Gene Kim-Eng <techwr -at- genek -dot- com>
To: Lauren <lauren -at- writeco -dot- net>
Date: Fri, 2 Nov 2012 14:14:07 -0700

Ultimately the question for everyone involved, contractor and client, is
what is the objective of the contract, and what is a reasonable trade-off
for it?

As a contractor, are you financially independent and able to pick and
choose your contracts based on how engaging or fulfilling they are, or are
you there to log enough billable hours to pay the bills while impressing
your clients enough to make them want to hire you again?

As a client, are you willing to pay to have a seasoned professional
standing by, using idle time to become more knowledgeable about your
project and ready to ramp up to full speed at a moment's, or will someone
cheap you can hire quick off Craigslist to edit your SMEs' notes enable you
to save the extra cost?

And don't say "both," because there is always one that ends up being more
persuasive than the other.

If contractor and client turn out to have conflicting objectives, it is
time for them to agree to end their agreement. Doing otherwise will seldom
lead to an acceptable result for either.

Gene Kim-Eng


On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 12:46 PM, Lauren <lauren -at- writeco -dot- net> wrote:

> There needs to be communication to determine if continuing the contract
> has any utility. Contractors need to communicate with their employer,
> unless they are the corporation that the client is working with. If the
> contractor is working with an employment agency (recruiter), then the
> contractor is a sub-contractor to that agency. The sub-contractor must
> talk to the contractor and the contractor must talk to the client to nail
> down the scope of work if the contract is for writing and that is not what
> the sub-contractor is doing. If the under-utilization is still within the
> scope of work, then the sub-contractor needs to let the client and
> contractor know that more work is necessary.
>
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References:
when is it ok to leave a contract job?: From: Becca
Re: when is it ok to leave a contract job?: From: Gene Kim-Eng
Re: when is it ok to leave a contract job?: From: Lisa G Wright
Re: when is it ok to leave a contract job?: From: Lauren

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