Re: Resume styles

Subject: Re: Resume styles
From: "Stuart Burnfield" <slb -at- westnet -dot- com -dot- au>
To: "Techwr-l" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2015 09:24:56 +0800

1. Many TWs have done a succession of short-duration contracts

Explain that many smaller or newer companies don't need a full-time
TW, just as they don't need a full-time lawyer or bookkeeper. Or there
are peaks in the workload when multiple projects overlap, and the
permanent staff can't do everything at once. So there's a need for
flexible, skilled TWs who can quickly pick up and work on a project
for a few weeks or months and move on. If you have some repeat clients
on your resume this will show that you have customers who were happy
with your work but didn't need you there full-time.

The underlying concern might be that you'll leave them in the lurch
after a few months if a better job comes up, because you're so, you
know, flighty and unstable. You could say that you enjoyed the variety
and learning opportunities of contract work and were comfortable with
having occasional gaps between contracts, but now, personally and
professionally, you'd like to focus on one job in one place. The
downside of contract work is that we're often hired to update existing
flawed docs using an inefficient process. There's no scope to make
longer-term improvements, as there is in a full-time position.

2. Why isn't your rÃsumà flashier?

The point about making it machine-scannable is a good one. Also, many
or most applications are filtered through an agency. Rushed
copy-pasting done by less-skilled recruiters can give a poor
impression of the applicant's writing and layout skills. Simpler is
better.

Another point is that the job description didn't suggest that flashy
visuals were a requirement. Usually you would let your work samples do
the talking and if the job includes marketing materials and
eye-catching presentation you'd be happy to provide samples.

Do you get the impression that this person has an odd understanding of
what a TW is and does? Perhaps you could ask him tactfully but
directly. It might help you either to get the job or to decide it's
not for you.

Best of luck, Chris.

--- Stuart

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