Re: (Against) sneaking your name in

Subject: Re: (Against) sneaking your name in
From: Beverly Parks <bparks -at- HUACHUCA-EMH1 -dot- ARMY -dot- MIL>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 1995 07:12:30 MST

Sally Marquigny <SALLYM -at- MSMAILHQ -dot- NETIMAGE -dot- COM> writes--
The way I usually come up with a nice fictional cross-section is to
use names of people I've known; for example, I'll use the first
name of my best friend when I was 8 combined with the last
name of current neighbor 2 doors down the street. Or combine my
brother-in-law's middle name (as a first name) with the name of the
town I lived in 5 years ago (as a last name). Fake addresses are
easy if you remember any previous addresses you've had (work or home).
Just change the street number or name a little bit, and
it's an apparently valid address, even down to the zip code.

I have a *very* strong opinion against using blatantly fictional/cutesy
examples in any documentation; IMO, it's insulting to the audience,
even if they do get a chuckle out of it at first glance. It's annoying
thereafter.
=======
Personally, I see more of a hazard in Sally's method than using
blatantly fictional names and addresses. At least with blatant
fiction, the user is likely to *know* it's fictional. Combining
real names or just changing the street number on an old address
you had is *still* going to be *somebody's* name or address. My
childhood address was 69 Leonard Ave. If I change it to 102
Leonard Ave just for the sake of changing it, that is still
going to be a valid address. Worse--some unsuspecting citizen
may actually get unwanted mail because of it.

=*= Beverly Parks =*= bparks -at- huachuca-emh1 -dot- army -dot- mil =*=
=*= "Unless otherwise stated, all comments are my own. =*=
=*= I am not representing my employer in any way." =*=


Previous by Author: Re: Questions that are not questions
Next by Author: Re: Left hand side
Previous by Thread: Re: (Against) sneaking your name in
Next by Thread: Re: (Against) sneaking your name in


What this post helpful? Share it with friends and colleagues:

Sponsored Ads


Sponsored Ads