Re: Things to do in Seattle

Subject: Re: Things to do in Seattle
From: Suzanne Gerrior <Suzanne -dot- Gerrior -at- SOFTIMAGE -dot- COM>
Date: Thu, 2 May 1996 13:58:34 -0400

Wow what a response! Far too many people to respond to, so here it is, enjoy!

Suzanne
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following is a list of things to do in Seattle.


I don't know what interests you particularly, but I have enjoyed
visiting the Seattle Art Museum, which is right downtown. Also,
there is an outstanding Asian Art Museum located in Volunteer
Park in building that was formerly the Seattle Art Museum. This
park is up on Capital Hill and has view, on sunny days, of the
water. It also has a small arboretum that is worth a visit.

Twice I have done the "Underground Tour" that leaves from a `pub'
in Pioneer Square downtown. It's a hoot! It's a 90-minute or
so walk thru old area, including UNDER the city. Pioneer Square
is also right downtown.

Seattle has terrific public transportation, and within a central
core area, buses are REALLY cheap during daytime.

I've twice taken ferry and/or Victoria Clipper to go over to
Victoria, B.C. --- definitely worth a visit.

Historical park at Port Townsend is worth visiting also as is
the drive to Mt. Rainier.

I hope this helps...there is lots of literature available in racks,
etc., once you get there for all this and more.

>>>>It's fun to go to Victoria, BC, but it takes the whole day, and then
some. Pike's Place Market is fun, but is somewhat like the French Quarter
in New Orleans or the City Market(? in Charleston. Luckily,
Pike's Place is one block up from the waterfront and a few blocks from
the aquarium, if you want to hit several places at once. My personal
favorite place is the locks/fish ladder -- there are some great places to
eat on the water just beyond the locks. The locks aren't within walking
distance of downtown, but you could take the bus, a cab, drive (if you'll
have a car). A cool way to see the locks is by cruise. This locks tour
leaves from the waterfront (a few blocks from Pike's Place), and I think
it's a little pricey compared to the shorter harbor tours ($25-30ish?).
It can also run long (2-3 hours), depending on the boat traffic in the
locks. It's interesting, though. Here are a few restaurant
recommendations: Ray's Boathouse, just beyond the locks (we like the bar
upstairs, which serves most of their standard menu items, but is cheaper
and less formal). Another restaurant idea (which is downtown, I think) is
the Metropolitan Grill, which I think is famous, pricey, but allegedly
well worth it. We haven't tried it ourselves, though. Unfortunately, we
don't know too much about the restaurant picture downtown, because
parking is such a problem. The Space Needle is perhaps the most
"touristy" site of them all. The view is great, though, providing the
weather is good. There are mountains and water in almost every direction,
and it's great to see them from above. I wouldn't recommend it on a
cloudy day. There's a tiny amusement park and a few other attractions at
the base. The trip up is about $6, and I've heard that dinner at the
restaurant at the top is overpriced and not worth it. It's fun to order a
drink at the top, though, but just beware of the Space Needle drink,
which costs about $18!!!! There's a handy little monorail that goes from
downtown to the Space Needle. I haven't been to Tillicum, but I've heard
it's a nice. If you don't have time to go on a harbor tour, then you
would at least get to see some of the sound on the Tillicum trip. >>>>>

Tillicum was offered as one of the sightseeing adventures for STC
participants. Good luck, have fun, and perhaps I'll see you there! ! !
BTW, if you hear of anything else, a must do, please forward to me. NC
is a long way away, and this is my first trip to PNWest.

Seattle has tons of groovy stuff--mostly shopping and parks, but what else
is there ;-) The Seattle Art Museum (SAM) is on 2nd Ave at either Union
or University. Lots of great stuff. Capital Hill (just over I-5 from the
convention) is pretty hip once you get over all the street people. Of
course, compared to NYC it's nothing. Green Lake for jogging, walking, or
just hanging out is heavenly. If you've got good company and are prepared
to spend big bucks on dinner, Pescatore on the Ballard Locks (which are
their own sight) makes a mouth-watering whatever you can think of. I
prefer the halibut myself. If you've got access to a car and like driving
tours, just go for a drive around Lake Washington. The neighborhoods are
lovely. And of course, for night life and galleries, Pioneer Square is
where it's at. P-Sq also has an excellent bookstore, Elliot Bay books, in
which you could easily become lost. Hope you have a groovy trip. Wish I
were going to be there. But then, I can go to Seattle EVERY day ;-)



If you like wineries, there are at least two just outside of Seattle in
Woodinville (about 20 miles from Seattle)--Chateau St. Michelle and another
one I can't think of the name of right now, as well as the Red Hook brewery.
They are all practically across the street from each other in a very pretty
rural area. The St. Michelle winery often has concerts or special events
happening on the grounds there, too.

Pioneer Square in downtown Seattle has a lot of nice shops, restaurants,
etc. There is also an "Underground" tour of the parts of Seattle that have
been buried since a big fire in the late 1800s. I haven't actually taken the
tour, but I hear it is really interesting.

Seattle Center was the site of the 1964 World's Fair. There are special
ethnic celebrations there practically every week-end. In addition, there is

permanent arcade & rides area, the Pacific Science Center with lots of
interesting science exhibits and IMAX movies, the Exhibition Hall where
there is usually some kind of show going on--art, fashion, fishing, etc.--a
playhouse, and the opera hall, among other things. That is where the
Space Needle is, but the rest of the attractions there are at least as
interesting as the Space Needle. You can reach Seattle Center from
downtown via the monorail, which is a nice way to go and very inexpensive.

If you want a quick view of Puget Sound, take one of the ferries that head
across the Sound. You can get over to Bremerton in an hour or to Winslow
or Kingston in about half an hour. It is a beautiful ride and not too
expensive
if you don't take a car on the ferry (it's about $5 to Winslow and back, I
think). It's a very relaxing ride and you see some beautiful scenery. It
leaves
from downtown Seattle, so it is fairly easy to get to if you don't have a
car.

There are lots of other things to see and do. I am sure the hotel will have

list of things, or you can search the Web and come up with some other
things of interest.

If you like to swing dance, there is a really good band playing on May 4.
The dance is in Ballard at the Leif Ericson Hall. If you like baseball,
there
is also a Mariners game that night.


--
Suzanne Gerrior

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