WIW Home Office Technology Conference, Feb. 21, Washington, D.C.

Subject: WIW Home Office Technology Conference, Feb. 21, Washington, D.C.
From: Ken Reigner <cbs -at- ACCESS -dot- DIGEX -dot- NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:50:38 -0500

WIW 1998 Home Office Technology Conference To Help
Writers Boost Their Business Using Cyber Skills

Washington Independent Writers (WIW) is sponsoring a home office
technology conference to help those who work at home navigate their way
through cyberspace and the latest technology to publication and profit.

Entitled "Embracing Technology: Putting Your Home Office to Work for
You," the conference will be held Saturday, February 21, at the University
Club, 1135 16th St. N.W. in Washington, D.C., from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

WIW has recruited some first-rate, cyber-savvy experts for this
conference. They will offer advice in using technology to boost
productivity, market services, streamline business operations and research
information.

Besides formal presentations, plenty of time has been scheduled for
panelists to field questions from conference participants. Thus attendees
will have an opportunity to get answers to their practical, how-to
questions.

Following is the conference agenda:

8:00 to 9:00 a.m. Registration

9:00 to 9:15 a.m. Overview

Speakers:

Ken Reigner, Home Office Technology Conference coordinator; WIW board
member; chairman, WIW Technology Committee.

Clyde Linsley, WIW president.

9:15 to 10:30 a.m. Productivity: Putting Technology to Work

How technology can help you work more efficiently, manage your
business and save money.

Panelists:

Clyde Linsley (moderator), WIW president; chairman, WIW Legislative
Committee; a Washington-area free-lancer who writes for a variety of
print and online publications.

John A. (Jack) Butler, a Washington-area free-lance writer
specializing in maritime history research. In addition to two books
for Naval Institute Press, he is the author of "Information Gathering
in the Electronic Age" and a contributor to CPCUG Monitor.

Ken Norkin, free-lance copywriter and president of KN Creative,
stepped down from the vice presidency of a Washington-area advertising
agency to open his own business, supplying advertising, marketing and
public relations services.

Barbara St. Amand, WIW treasurer, is an economic consultant. As
treasurer, she was instrumental in automating WIW's finances and
records.

10:45 a.m. to 12 noon. Marketing: Fame and Fortune Through Technology

How technology can help you communicate with and sell to your markets.

Panelists:

William J. Moriarty (moderator), WIW board member; chairman, WIW
Advanced Writers/Professional Development Committee. In addition to
holding senior corporate communications positions for several years,
he has been a full-time, free-lance marketing writer for 16 years.
Under the business name of Copywright, he creates marketing materials,
from brochures to speeches and video scripts, for a wide variety of
corporate and non-profit clients.

Kim Gordon, chair, WIW Chevy Chase (Md.) Small Group; author, "Growing
Your Home-Based Business"; president of the National Marketing
Federation, based in Silver Spring, Md. Among other media, NMF
dispenses marketing advice via a telephone voice response system. She
is also one of a panel of business consultants available to answer
questions online at <http://TimeVista.com>. She handles marketing
inquiries for this free service.

Dia L. Michels, WIW vice president; chair, WIW Writers Defense Fund
Committee. An internationally published science and health writer, she
is the author of "Milk, Money & Madness: The Culture and Politics of
Breastfeeding." As president of Platypus Cards & Clothes, she designs
and distributes educational materials promoting breastfeeding, which
she sells at trade shows and via the Internet.

Meg Peters, the writer-designer founder of Wraparound Studio, a
company offering comprehensive World Wide Web services, including
design, writing, hosting and programming. For the past four years, she
has written advertising and promotional copy for The Washington Post
and free-lance clients.

12:15 to 1:30 p.m. The Bottom Line: How Technology Can Improve Your
Business

Linda Stern (lunch speaker), former WIW president; WIW advisory board
member; contributing editor, Home Office Computing magazine; associate
editor, Newsweek magazine; author, "Money-Smart Secrets for the Self-
Employed"; free-lance writer for 12 years.

1:45 to 3:00 p.m. Research: Using Technology To Find the Information You
Need

How to access an amazing amount of useful information without leaving
your home.

Panelists:

Paula Bohan (moderator), national market manager, ProfNet, an
Internet-based link to 4,300 news and information officers at colleges
and universities, corporations, think tanks, national labs, medical
centers, non-profits and public relations agencies. She joined ProfNet
in 1996 after seven years with PR Newswire in various editorial and
sales positions.

Joe Hennessy, a computer consultant based in Falls Church, Va., will
provide tips for finding shareware on the Internet.

David Herbert, information systems manager and programmer for
DataNational in Chantilly, Va., the publisher of the Community
PhoneBook. He will detail techniques for getting the most out of
online search engines.

Sergio Visaggio, programming director, Research and Learn Channel,
America Online. During his three years with AOL, he has held a variety
of management positions in the content distribution area. Before
joining AOL, he spent four years in marketing with NYNEX.

3:15 to 4:30 p.m. Ask the Experts: Taking the Next Step

Everything you always wanted to know about computer hardware, software
and services.

Panelists:

Ken Reigner (moderator), Home Office Technology Conference
coordinator; WIW board member; chairman, WIW Technology Committee;
founder and list owner of WIW's two Internet-based mailing lists,
WIW-L and WIW-JOBS. After many years as a writer, editor, press
secretary and legislative assistant, he established CompuMedia
Business Services in College Park, Md., where he provides editorial,
computer, media, public relations and resume services.

Rob F. Deziel, a computer consultant with the Next Generation Office
Services in Springfield, Va., will describe how to go about locating a
cyber guru who will help choose, set up and service high tech
equipment in your home office.

Melinda (Mindy) McAdams, Web strategist, the American Press Institute,
Reston, Va. After writing for The Washington Post, Time magazine and a
weekly trade publication, she became the first content developer at
Digital Ink, The Post's online subsidiary in 1994. She has trained
journalists around the world in Web-based publishing and design. She
is co-author of "The Internet Handbook for Writers, Researchers and
Journalists."

Rob Pegoraro, "Fast Forward" editor, The Washington Post, covers the
Internet and computer hardware and software for this high technology
area of The Post published Fridays in the "Weekend" section. He
recently covered the Internet World trade show in New York.

4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Reception with cash bar

Early reservations are encouraged. The cost is $85 for WIW members and
$110 for non-members for advance reservations; $100 for members and $125
for non-members at the door. A special combined rate for new membership and
conference attendance is being offered at $170 for advance reservations,
and $185 at the door.

WIW is a non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C., for
writers, editors and journalists. Founded in 1975, WIW is the largest
regional writers' organization in the country with approximately 2,000
members.

Persons wishing more information about the conference or reservations
can call the WIW office at (202) 347-4973.

Information is available on the World Wide Web at
<http://www.net-writers.org> or via e-mail at <mailto:washwriter -at- aol -dot- com>.
The WIW office is located at 220 Woodward Building, 733 15th St. N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20005, USA.

WIW also sponsors an Internet-based discussion and mailing list,
WIW-L. To subscribe, send e-mail to <listserv -at- cmuvm -dot- csv -dot- cmich -dot- edu>, and in
the body of the message, put the line "subscribe WIW-L your-first-name
your-last-name" (without the quotation marks).

[Please forgive the cross-posts.]

- 30 -

--
Ken Reigner cbs -at- digex -dot- net
Member, Board of Directors List Owner, WIW-L and WIW-JOBS
Chairman, Technology Committee wiw-l-request -at- cmuvm -dot- csv -dot- cmich -dot- edu
Washington Independent Writers wiw-jobs-request -at- cmuvm -dot- csv -dot- cmich -dot- edu




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