RE: To Cc or not to Cc

Subject: RE: To Cc or not to Cc
From: "Geoff Lane" <geoff -at- gjctech -dot- co -dot- uk>
To: "TECHWR-L (E-mail)" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- raycomm -dot- com>
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 14:48:14 -0000

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kathi Jan Knill
>
> The abbreviation cc: goes back to the time when letters were
> typed on a
> typewriter and there were no photocopying machines. At that
> time cc: was
> used at the bottom of typed letters and the abbreviation
> stood for "carbon
> copied." It meant that the person whose name was to the right
> of the colon
> was "sent a carbon copy" of the letter.
---

This may be another of those transatlantic differences, but in UK (according
to the Oxford Dictionary) "cc" is an abreviation of "carbon copy". "Copy"
can be either a noun or a verb, and it is present tense as a verb. So to
you can either carbon copy the message to someone, or you can send a carbon
copy of the message to someone. Personally, I'd use the noun form in this
situation. So, "If you want to send a carbon copy (cc) of the message to
another user, ..."

HTH,

Geoff Lane
Cornwall, UK
geoff -at- gjctech -dot- co -dot- uk





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