Re: "mock", not "mock-up", as a noun ?

Subject: Re: "mock", not "mock-up", as a noun ?
From: Kathleen MacDowell <kathleen -dot- eamd -at- gmail -dot- com>
To: Monique Semp <monique -dot- semp -at- earthlink -dot- net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2013 19:18:56 -0500

I imagine this could be a conundrum in a job, especially for a new hire:

shall I go along with the current odd usages to be accepted; am I going to
offend people if I question it?
is there some reason I don't know about that validates these odd terms
(e.g., language usage)?
(does the company care enough for me to correct this?)

I've encountered this situation several times, and after clarifying as much
as possible any background, have converted the terminology to the correct
term (mock up), or substituted an alternate (e.g., model).

I suspect that some of these situations result from new writers, or from
people who are caught up in their own head when they're writing. It just
takes new eyes to see there's something missing.

Kathleen



On Tue, Jul 30, 2013 at 4:57 PM, Monique Semp <monique -dot- semp -at- earthlink -dot- net>wrote:

> Somewhat related to the recent âverb noun install failâ thread and
> changing word usage, I just saw âmock it ...â instead of âmock it up...â,
> and âmocks should be sufficientâ instead of âmock-ups should be sufficientâ.
>
> I checked dictionary.com, and they do show âmockâ as a noun, meaning
> âimitation, counterfeit, fakeâ. But the verb for creating such a mock-up
> (or mock) still seems to be âmock upâ.
>
> * Any idea if âmockâ as a verb, in this context (not to ridicule someone
> or something), is achieving the status of a rightful and correct word?
>
> * And what about the less pejorative use of âmockâ as a noun, meaning
> âmodelâ, vs. the dictionaryâs usage for âimitation, counterfeit, fakeâ?
>
> Perhaps usage depends on whether weâre talking US English vs. British
> English vs. many other English dialects?
>
> Just wondering,
> -Monique
>
>
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--
Kathleen MacDowell
kathleen -dot- eamd -at- gmail -dot- com


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"mock", not "mock-up", as a noun ?: From: Monique Semp

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