Re: Usage of chemistry abbreviation for Normal (N)

Subject: Re: Usage of chemistry abbreviation for Normal (N)
From: "Peter Neilson" <neilson -at- windstream -dot- net>
To: TECHWR-L <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>, Emoto <emoto1 -at- gmail -dot- com>
Date: Thu, 03 Sep 2020 14:58:38 -0400

It seems to vary. I'd go with the space. The theory goes like this:
- Some people use "no space"for SI units.
- N is not an SI unit.
- Under certain uses "N" is ambiguous. 0.4MNH4OH is bad enough, but 0.4NNH4OH ???
- Modern typography allows various sorts of spaces. If you use plain text for a chemistry journal, they already have a style guide and have skilled typesetters who will make your single 0X20 space right, according to their standards.
- If you are preparing in TEX or some similar typographic system, a thin non-breaking space might be appropriate.
- The client's standard should apply unless it is overwhelmingly bad and needs your services as a writer-of-standards.
- Do not expect enthusiastic response to any suggestion that the client's standards are broken and need repair.

If you do not know the standard that will be applied by your client, use a space. Try to avoid writing 0.6
N where the N appears on the next line, even if it necessitates writing so that the normality in question falls near the beginning of a paragraph.

When in need of moral support, look up the compound dioxygen difluoride, FOOF.

On Thu, 03 Sep 2020 13:43:00 -0400, Emoto <emoto1 -at- gmail -dot- com> wrote:

Hi,

Can someone point me toward an authoritative source for usage of the N that
is short for normal? Is there a space between the N and its number value?

For example:

0.2N NaOH

or

0.2 N NaOH

I'm working on a bunch of docs that have this in them and would like to
make them all consistent, and would like to base my decision on more than
what looks good to me. I like the space in front of the N, but would
happily bow to some higher authority.

Thanks,

Bob
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References:
Usage of chemistry abbreviation for Normal (N): From: Emoto

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