Re: tech writing and presentations

Subject: Re: tech writing and presentations
From: Barry Kieffer <barryk -at- MDHOST -dot- CSE -dot- TEK -dot- COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 1997 09:49:44 PST

Lori:

A large part of technical writing is in course
development and training.

There is a good size market for technical
communicators to develop content for course
development, and then present that material to
groups.

This all falls under the job description of "trainer".

The bulk of the jobs are in the software application
market. Typically a company needs a bright
articulate individule to teach new and prospective
customers how to use thier software application.

Many of these jobs are inhouse, but most will require
some travel to customers locations.

To be able to break in to this line of work a
communications background is a start. Some marketing
classes help too. You will also need to know about
software. You do not have to be a programmer, but you
must know how to use industry standard applications
like Microsoft Windows, what C/C++ is, what UNIX is,
and general knowelge about the software field is
important for your credability.

A manufacturer will train you on their application
and will teach you any special skills you may need to
know, like basic UNIX commands for example.

The pay in this field varies. Most trainers I know
make good money. Starting salary on the East and
West coast is around $30-35,000 minimum, and can
climb quickly. Most companies treat trainers as real
assets, and are liberal in travel expences. Actual
salary in most cases exceeds $50,000 easy.

Best of luck in you future endevers. Our field of
work can always use new talent.

Regards,

Barry Kieffer
MBD Customer Documentation
Tektronix

My views, and my views only...

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