Re: Lying applicants

Subject: Re: Lying applicants
From: "Michele Cottingham (BCS)" <cottingh -at- GROUCHO -dot- BSN -dot- USF -dot- EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Sep 1998 09:22:23 -0400

Andrew,

I believe that liars should bear the consequences of their actions. How
can put your trust in a person's word if you know them to lie to you,
blatantly in your face? I do agree that firing that young woman was best
for you and your company.

I know that sometimes my honesty of my skills or lack of skills have kept
me from attaining certain jobs even though I had the majority of skills
that the employer needed. However, because of one certain task that had to
be done with a certain software, I am not eligible to obtain the position.
I would rather be upfront with the person and let them know so there are
no suprises on either side. I can lie and say I have the skills, even get
away with it by fussing around. Someday, it will come back to bite me and
I look foolish as a professional writer in this field.

I am caught in a situatin of lack of employment or training.

I tell them that I am a quick study since I do have the basics as well as
expertise of the others, but they don't want to train me for that certain
task. I guess they are willing to sift through all the others who say yes,
but really lack the skills or those who are genuine but require more
money.

Michele
Aspiring writer


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Michele Cottingham
Technical Writer/Graphic Artist
email:cottingh -at- groucho -dot- bsn -dot- usf -dot- edu
url:http://www.bsn.usf.edu/~cottingh

Follow the Golden Rule
Treat each other's email as you would like yours to be treated.


















On Mon, 21 Sep 1998, Andrew Plato wrote:

> What the hell is wrong with technical writers these days? I want to share
> this little story with you because it is driving me nuts.
>
> In the past three months I have had five applicants lie through their teeth
> to me about their skills. They sat there in my office and blatant lied to
> me about their skills. For example, I hired a person (not from this list)
> who claimed extensive knowledge of Windows NT and relational databases. At
> my company, a tech writer with good SQL skills is like a hunk of gold. My
> clients are so desperate for writers with database experience that
> naturally, when anyone comes in the door with claims such knowledge, I am
> inclined to overlook some deficiencies to get them on site right away.
>
> Nevertheless, when this person got on-site, she quickly demonstrated her
> incompetence with Windows and databases. She could not handle basic stuff
> like using a web browser, unzipping archive files, and changing network
> settings. She did not know what "relational integrity" or a "primary key"
> was. Worse yet, she spent most of her first few days chatting with a fellow
> consultant about absolutely nothing. At one point I came on site and found
> her babbling away irritating another consultant. I asked her to return to
> her desk and that she needed to get up to speed on the application we were
> documenting. A hour later, she still had not run through the installation
> and was back chatting and gossiping.
>
> The client pulled me aside at the end of the week and said they had serious
> concerns about this writer. That was it for me. When the client says they
> are worried, it's serious. So I yanked her off the job immediately .
> Thankfully, this person elected to subcontract so I was able to term her
> contract.
>
> Naturally, this person was angry with me. I told her that the client saw
> her incompetence and became very, very worried (which they did). At the
> rates I charge the client was not willing to pay for an incompetent writer.
> They had already cycled through six worthless writers before we showed up.
> In fact, they hired us because we have a reputation for fast, solid
> documentation work.
>
> This person was adamant that she had all these "extensive" skills. Yet, in
> a week on site she managed to A) do nothing B) demonstrate her complete lack
> of knowledge of Windows, SQL, databases, etc. C) embarrass other
> consultants with her unprofessional gossiping and chatter.
>
> All this lead me to an interesting discovery. People believe their lies.
> This person I hired honestly believed she was a Windows NT and SQL expert.
> She was just appalled that people could not see that. How do your respond
> to that?
>
> "Well, not only are you incompetent, but you have an extremely overinflated
> opinion of yourself."
>
> Sheesh, our own damn President thinks it is okay to lie.
>
> Well, I don't want to get into the current political scandals, but I am
> bothered about this. I am seeing more and more writers who are just
> blatantly lying to me about their skills. I remember I asked a long time
> ago what others here did when they had a non-technical tech writer. Well,
> now I have a new question. What do you do with liars?
>
> So, I am curious to hear your thoughts. Liars and cheats? How do we ferret
> them out? And when you do catch them, what do you do with them? Fire 'em,
> whack them with a 2x4, let the ice weasels nibble their eyeballs out?
>
> Respond off list. I'll post a blatantly one-sided summary in a few years.
> :-)
>
> ------------------------------------------------
> Andrew Plato
> President / Principal Liar
> Anitian Consulting, Inc.
>
>
> From ??? -at- ??? Sun Jan 00 00:00:00 0000==
>
>
>


From ??? -at- ??? Sun Jan 00 00:00:00 0000=



Previous by Author: Re: Manager in onejump. Documentation Management
Next by Author: get together in Florida
Previous by Thread: Re: Lying applicants
Next by Thread: Re: Lying applicants


What this post helpful? Share it with friends and colleagues:

Sponsored Ads


Sponsored Ads