Re: salvaging damaged business relationships

Subject: Re: salvaging damaged business relationships
From: MichaelHuggins -at- aol -dot- com
To: "TECHWR-L" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- raycomm -dot- com>
Date: Thu, 14 Feb 2002 10:06:22 EST

Andrew wrote:

>Why didn't he pay you? You said he breached the contract. Did he have a
reason? Generally people don't just breech contracts for fun. They have
reasons. Do you know his reasons?

You need to know why people are angry or upset with your work. A customer
relationship hinges on communication. Most failed relationships are due to
miscommunication on somebody's part. <


Sue, it's too bad you've come up against this, although it seems to be in inevitable part of business life. Some people do breach contracts for fun; or, to put it another way, because they cannot quite get themselves to believe that the normal rules of life apply to them as well as to everyone else. They may get away with this for a long time, either through luck or because their bad behavior doesn't provoke sufficiently harmful consequences for their employer. Indeed, they may have an instinct for only mistreating parties that they think will be too small to retaliate.

Whether he did it for fun or not, if he truly *breached* the contract--as opposed to legitimately raising a perceived issue of failure to perform or adhere to standards on your part, and making full payment contingent on resolution of that issue--you need to take action, although no action in a situation like this is without risk.

> Anyway back to the issue. When I spoke to this other manager he was
very
> professional and he certainly knew his stuff as far as management. He
said
> for my information the guy I had been working with was taking over
another
> Department and he gave me the name of the woman who was taking over from
> him. (aaahhh a woman....sorry guys lol)

> What I need to know is what is the best way for me to approach her,
bearing
> in mind that she is new to the Company and hasn't had a chance to see
how
> this guy operates and in fact might never see. Theres a good chance hes
> said we had a lot of trouble with this writer bla bla bla. How do I
salvage
> this relationship. The manager was adamant that he would be happy for
me to
> continue working with the Company, but I dont know if he was just using
that
> as a way to rehabilitate his image.<

He may have been doing just that. If I were in your place, I would contact the new manager and say, "I have appreciated the opportunity to work with your company and hope to continue to do so. I have been unable to get payment on the last contract I performed, even though the work has been completed and no issue was raised of performance or quality. If there are any issues outstanding, I would be happy to address them. I would appreciate it if you and I could schedule a time to discuss this, as well as discussing opportunities for me to do future work for your company. I look forward to meeting you."

Michael Huggins

























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