RE: When is a Shim Not a Shim?

Subject: RE: When is a Shim Not a Shim?
From: "Robert Plamondon" <robert -at- plamondon -dot- com>
To: "TECHWR-L" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- raycomm -dot- com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2003 06:49:53 -0700


In hardware design parlance, what you're describing is a "wrapper" -- a
chunk of Verilog or VHDL code, mostly declarations, that let you drop a
module into an environment in which it otherwise wouldn't fit.

It's very common to have two modules which you are very reluctant to touch,
because they're used in multiple designs or because you're licensing them
from someone else and are not allowed to open them up. So you shim them with
a "wrapper" so they align with one another.

A typical example would be when one module defines eight wires as a bus and
another defines them as eight wires, and it takes a declaration equating the
two to connect the modules together. That's a wrapper. There may be actual
circuitry involved, too, but it's almost always trivial and obvious compared
to what's in the modules.

-- Robert
--
Robert Plamondon
President, High-Tech Technical Writing
robert -at- plamondon -dot- com
http://www.plamondon.com/HIGHTECH/homepage.html
"We're Looking for a Few Good Clients"



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