Best graphics format to import into Power Point?

Subject: Best graphics format to import into Power Point?
From: Geoff Hart <ghart -at- videotron -dot- ca>
To: "TECHWR-L" <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 09:06:59 -0500


Elizabeth O'Shea wonders: <<Can the Power Point experts out there recommend the best graphics format for images we import into Power Point.>>

There is no one "best" format: different types of image require different formats. For example, jpeg is best for photos, GIF or PNG for illustrations, and different video formats for different types of video. About the only ones you should never use are BMP and TIFF; the former are difficult to scale properly, and the latter are best saved for print production.

<<Ideally, we'd like sales reps to be able to scale the images if possible. You can also tell me if letting them scale images themselves is a bad idea.>>

In my experience, engineers and scientists are lousy at working with images, and I strongly suspect sales reps will be no better. You should also ask yourself whether letting them do whatever they want with images serves any useful purpose or whether the consistency and professionalism that comes from designing a standard template that looks good would be more effective.

These folk should be focusing on creating and presenting content, not fiddling with images and layouts--a task very few of them have any understanding of. One of my favorite Dilbert cartoons is the one where he spends an entire day fondling fonts in a presentation, and that is his only accomplishment. Leave image fiddling and visual design to the experts.

Moreover, scaling images in any program other than the program that created them (including PowerPoint) always adds to the size and complexity of the image: in addition to the raw image data, you add a whole layer of instructions that the software must decipher on how to resize and rescale the image. I've seen relatively simple, 40-slide presentations balloon to 30+ Meg because the creators had no self-discipline and no knowledge of how to create an effective presentation.

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Geoff Hart ghart -at- videotron -dot- ca
(try geoffhart -at- mac -dot- com if you don't get a reply)
www.geoff-hart.com
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References:
Best graphics format to import into Power Point: From: Elizabeth O'Shea

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