Re: bouncing back from interview disappointment (WAS: Advice needed for an upcoming interview)

Subject: Re: bouncing back from interview disappointment (WAS: Advice needed for an upcoming interview)
From: Tony Chung <tonyc -at- tonychung -dot- ca>
To: TECHWR-L <techwr-l -at- lists -dot- techwr-l -dot- com>
Date: Tue, 28 May 2013 23:50:36 -0700

A couple of years ago I interviewed for a job through a weird process. This
newly hired team lead claimed to have reviewed 1000 resumes (slight
exaggeration according to my friend who worked in HR), and invited 5 of us
to come in for a test administered in the same room at the same time.
Looking at my "competition", I could see that we were a varied bunch.

As we took the test, which consisted of academic English grammar, practical
technical communications, and technical knowledge, the team lead sat at one
end of the table messing about on Twitter. I later found updates about this
lead's evil streak, who enjoyed freaking out 5 hopeful colleagues. We were
then sent on our way. We weren't even compensated for the 2 hours of
parking.

In stage two, this team lead called each of us for a phone interview. The
first thing we discussed was that one candidate didn't think it was
necessary to submit a portfolio, so this candidate was axed. There wasn't
time to bring up the lack of professionalism in discussing another
candidate, but I digress. We opened the conversation where I didn't perform
as well on the academic portion of the test, but I aced the technical
knowledge. The lead acknowledged I had a better understanding of the
company's product line and target market than the lead.

The conversation kept going without any solid understanding of what things
could look like. Then things got weird. I asked what this lead considered
would be a dream team. The response: "Well, I can do everything. It all
depends if you prefer graphics or writing, I'd be willing to give you what
you can do and I'll pick up the slack." This lead's arrogance was
incredible. I was hoping that I'd be offered the job just so I could turn
it down.

Fortunately I dodged that bullet and was sent a form email that they
weren't hiring me. I found out from my HR friend that nobody was hired from
that round. How could 1000 applications not reveal any qualified candidates?

Later I found a comment on Lifehacker, and a profile page by this lead, who
said how difficult it was to find qualified help.

The company ran the same ad a couple more times. And I saw another post for
the same job just this week. Turnover or growth? One of my previous
supervisors (and now friends) saw that ad and thought I would be the ideal
candidate for the position because of my experience. In fact, my friend
joked that if the company arranged an interview, my friend would have
asked, "Why didn't you hire Tony Chung, because he knows more than you do
about your own company?"


Anyway, the point is: Anonymous -- DON'T TAKE RESPONSIBILITY for the
ineptness of the interview process. In this day and age, it's an employer's
market. They can afford to waste peoples' time and ask candidates to
interview four times with different layers of management. This is primarily
a stalling tactic because they haven't a clue what their needs are. They
need professionals like us to say, these are your pain points. This is what
you need to make the pain go away. Then deliver on the promise.

I much prefer the jobs where I know the people, and the interview is just
to determine if I fit in with the organization, or am able to figure out
the job. I'm always open to discussing opportunities in the techcom/web
enhancement/technology fields, because I'm not rooted in my current job,
and would jump at another chance to change the world.

That old adage about not hiring friends is a myth. I have done my best work
when I worked for people I know who knew me. I guess that means you need to
hire/work for the right friends.

Cheers,
-Tony
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References:
bouncing back from interview disappointment (WAS: Advice needed for an upcoming interview): From: Anonymous
Re: bouncing back from interview disappointment (WAS: Advice needed for an upcoming interview): From: Peter Neilson
Re: bouncing back from interview disappointment (WAS: Advice needed for an upcoming interview): From: Ken Poshedly
Re: bouncing back from interview disappointment (WAS: Advice needed for an upcoming interview): From: David Crosswell

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